Home » William Wetmore Story And His Friends: From Letters, Diaries, And Recollections. Volume 2 by Henry James
William Wetmore Story And His Friends: From Letters, Diaries, And Recollections. Volume 2 Henry James

William Wetmore Story And His Friends: From Letters, Diaries, And Recollections. Volume 2

Henry James

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ISBN : 9780543692092
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This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can usually download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1903 edition. Excerpt: ... VIII. THE CLEOPATRA ANDMoreThis historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can usually download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1903 edition. Excerpt: ... VIII. THE CLEOPATRA AND THE LIBYAN SIBYL. The year 1862 was a date, the date, in Storys life- bringing with it the influence, the sense of possibilities of success, the prospect of a full and free development, under which he settled-- practically for the rest of his days--and which was to encounter in the time to come no serious check. The time immediately to come was to have its dark days--which were the dark days of the American Civil War, that weary middle period of anxiety almost unrelieved, especially for spectators at a distance whose sympathies were with the North and to whom it sometimes seemed that the issue scarce hung in the balance. Story was in England each of these years and inevitably in contact with much feeling and expression, in this connection, that was not of a nature to soothe patriotic soreness. His own sentiments and convictions relieved themselves by a demonstration on which he was distinctly to be congratulated and of which we shall presently encounter evidence. But meanwhile his artistic and his personal success were of the greatest, and, as the shadow of the War slowly cleared, life, activity and ambition opened out for him in a hundred interesting ways. The effect produced by his work at the Exhibition of 1862 was immediate and general, and would carry us back, should we follow the clue, to a near and suggestive view of the taste, the aesthetic sensibility of the time. The clue would take us, however, too far- we can only feel, as we pass, a certain envy of a critical attitude easier, simpler and less evolved than our own. Critical attitude is doubtless even too much to say- the sense to which, for the most part, the work of art or of imagination, the picture, the. statue, the novel, the play, appealed...